Rowe

Title

Rowe

Description

This edited collection seeks to answer the following inquiry question: How did the practice of "slumming" in 1920s jazz clubs in New York City contribute to the blurring of racial boundaries?

Contributor

Elizabeth Rowe

Collection Items

The Weary Blues
"The Weary Blues" is a poem by Langston Hughes, a poet commonly considered to be a major figure in the Harlem Renaissance, and one of the founding members of the jazz poetry movement. The poem captures the feeling and spirit of a jazz club by…

I've Found a New Baby
Ethel Waters was a prominent jazz vocalist in the 1920s. Her music demonstrates what the boundary-blurring jazz music of the 1920s actually sounded like. It is critical to understand the music itself, because it is the linchpin of the ensuing social…

I'm Just Wild About Harry
I came across this source in researching Eubie Blake, who wrote the first all-black musical to appear on Broadway. He was enormously commercially successful. This is one of the most famous songs from the musical, Shuffle Along. This song speaks…

Savoy Ballroom
The Savoy Ballroom was a very important music venue during the 1920s in New York City. This source is the "history" page from the Savoy Ballroom web site, as the venue is still in use. There are photos of prior performers from the 1920s,…

New Yorker Cover
This cover of the New Yorker from the 1920s depicts both the spirit and color of the Jazz Age. The cover conveys a sense of movement and rhythm. It is also important to note that the two people depicted in the image are of different races. This…

Darktown Dancin' School
This sheet music has been included in the primary source material in this collection because of the lyrical content. The Farber Sisters sing about attending Darktown Dancing School - learning how to dance and appreciate music by being exposed to the…

Heah Me Talkin'
Louis Armstrong is considered one of the greatest American musicians of all time, according to secondary source material quoted in the introductory essay. His inclusion in these primary sources is to help the viewer understand his musical prowess.…

18th Amendment
The Eighteenth Amendment is the Prohibition amendment -- that is, it outlawed the sale and consumption of alcohol. This is an important primary source to include in the collection because it sets the cultural tone for the jazz age. Consumption of…
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