"Jovial Sons of Erin: St. Patrick's Day Dinner A Lively Affair"

Title

"Jovial Sons of Erin: St. Patrick's Day Dinner A Lively Affair"

Subject

Irish-American, 20th Century

Description

This article is about the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick's annual St. Patrick's Day dinner. It illustrates the changing perception towards the Irish in the early 20th Century. Located in a national paper on the front page, the story about the dinner details the important individuals, such as Supreme Court Justice Edward Patterson, who attended the dinner and speaks of this assembly of Irish Americans in a celebratory tone.

Creator

The New York Tribune

Publisher

The New York Tribune

Date

March 18, 1900

Rights

"Jovial Sons of Erin: St. Patrick's Day Dinner A Lively Affair," The New York Tribune (March 18, 1900), accessed at Chronicling America, Library of Congress.

Format

Newspaper

Coverage

1900, Early 20th Century

Text

Excerpt from Article:

Not in a good many years, or, in fact, the comparison may be made still more emphatic by saying never before has the annual dinner of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick been marked by such general joviality as was last night’s banquet – the 116th anniversary festival of society. Over five hundred sons of Ireland gathered in Delmonico’s and in song and speech recalled the glories of their race. The men of Emerald Isle were in a particularly happy mood last night, remembering as they did how much has happened in the last year trending to give added honor to Ireland, and in consequence more recognition of the day set apart for commemorating Ireland’s patron saint. They recollected that in the South African war Irish soldiers led by Irish generals have borne the brunt of the battle, have given increased lustre to the traditional bravery and courage of the Celt, and that England’s Queen, in recognition of the prowess and achievements of Irish troops, has severed the red tape restrictions of the English army office which forbade the enlisted Irishman wearing the shamrock on St. Patrick’s Day…

In contending for his rights last night: he insisted that but for the Irish America would not be the free and independent country that she is to-day; that her battles on land and sea were won by generals and admirals of Irish descent or birth; that the drawing of the Declaration of Independence, bar the incident of composing it, was the work of Irishmen; that in the war with Spain…

Original Format

Newspaper Article

Collection

Citation

The New York Tribune, “"Jovial Sons of Erin: St. Patrick's Day Dinner A Lively Affair",” Inbetween Peoples, accessed October 29, 2020, https://as205.omeka.net/items/show/118.